How can loneliness and social isolation be reduced among migrant and minority ethnic people? Systematic, participatory review of programme theories, system processes and outcomes

A person walking through a forest with a plastic bag that says bargains for life

Funded by NIHRFunded by the UK National Institute for Health Research under the Public Health Research Board (Reference number PHR 16/08/44) 

 What are the aims of this project?

The main aim of this project is to summarise the existing evidence on the causes of, and potential solutions to, unwanted social isolation and loneliness among people from migrant and minority ethnic backgrounds. The project takes a broad approach, viewing social isolation and loneliness as the products of the complex social settings within which people live.

 Why is this important?

Loneliness and social isolation are recognised as major public health issues. Both have been found to be associated with a range of physical and mental health problems. Recent research addressing the negative effects of loneliness and social isolation on the health and wellbeing of individuals has paid particular attention to the circumstances of older people, pregnant and postpartum women and adolescents.

While loneliness and social isolation affect people from all sections of society, migrants and people from minority ethnic backgrounds face particular risks of social isolation and loneliness. As the diversity of the UK population continues to grow in terms of the range of ethnic identities and the number of people seeing themselves as non-White British, it becomes important that public health evidence and practice reflects this diversity and addresses the needs of our multi-ethnic society.

 How will the research be carried out?

We will undertake a review of the existing literature and research evidence around loneliness and social isolation among migrant and minority ethnic groups. This desk-based work will take place alongside the use of a participatory approach, involving consultations with key stakeholders and members of some of our local migrant and minority ethnic communities within England.

Our literature review work will consist of an effectiveness review; and a theory-driven review. The effectiveness review will draw together earlier research that has looked at whether initiatives that have been introduced work to reduce levels of loneliness and social isolation among migrant and minority ethnic people. The theory-driven review, on the other hand, will go beyond more traditional review methods to understand the actual causal processes that may be linked to changes in levels of loneliness and social isolation among our populations of interest in varied settings. We will look beyond narrowly focused interventions aimed at individuals to explore the wider social processes that impact upon isolation and loneliness.

Timeframe:

October 2017 – March 2019

Who is undertaking the research?

Professor Sarah Salway, Dr Louise Preston, Dr Andrew Booth, Dr Liz Such, Dr Katie Powell, Dr Maria Zubair, Dr Jean Hamilton (University of Sheffield) &

Professor Raghu Raghavan (De Montfort University)

Professor Christina Victor (Brunel University London)

  How are stakeholders being engaged?

The project involves close collaboration between university researchers, community workers, lay experts from migrant and minority ethnic backgrounds and public health practitioners and policy makers. The community consultation aspect of the project, in particular, involves significant community engagement. This comprises three consultation panels being organised at three different sites within England, each focussing on different subgroups of migrants and minority ethnic people and taking place twice during the course of the project. Furthermore, a dissemination workshop will be arranged towards the end of the project for a diverse group of around 30 stakeholder participants in order to promote engagement with and testing out of the recommendations and conclusions from the project.

What will be the outputs from the study?

Presentations and papers from the project will be listed here.

How can loneliness and social isolation be reduced among migrant and minority ethnic people? Systematic, participatory review of programme theories, system processes and outcomes. Sarah Salway, Louise Preston, Maria Zubair, Elizabeth Such, Jean Hamilton, Andrew Booth, Raghu Raghavan, Christina Victor

PROSPERO 2017 CRD42017077378 Available from:

http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.php?ID=CRD42017077378


Evaluating Co:Create (2016-2019)

Co Create

Project title

Evaluating Co:Create (2016-2019).

Funders

South Yorkshire Housing Association/Department of Health Innovation, Excellence and Strategic Development Fund.

Who is leading this research?

Amy Barnes and Janet Harris.

Project details

The Co:Create team at South Yorkshire Housing Association are working with commissioners in the health and social care field within South Yorkshire to change the way they commission services; redistributing power through a co-production process which seeks to ensure the voice of those receiving services, and particularly those who are seldom heard, are incorporated into commissioning. Janet and Amy are working with the Co:Create team to evaluate the Co:Create process, taking a developmental evaluation approach which seeks to produce real-time feedback to help adapt principles of practice.

While there is much interest and policy commitment to co-production across the countries of the UK, the evidence base on how co-production processes works, in what circumstances and with what outcomes is still limited. This project aims to add to the evidence base of what works in relation to co-production.

Timeframe

September 2016 – June 2019

Expected outputs

Outputs will be co-produced with the Co:Create team and local commissioners and service users throughout the process. We will be co-producing programme theories/systems models for a number of selected projects at the start of the process, and revisiting these and reflecting on successes, issues and ways forward throughout. We will also co-produce annual reports and a final report with the Co:Create team, commissioners and service users.

 

 


Good practice in the co-production of commissioned services within adult social care

Good Practice by Ron Mader https://www.flickr.com/photos/planeta/24569983877

Project title

Good practice in the co-production of commissioned services within adult social care

Funder

Skills for Care Workforce Development Innovation Fund

What are the aims of this project?

The aim is to evaluate whether the involvement of stakeholders in review and co-design of a modified Direct Payment Support Service for Disability informs changes in the design of the service and removes barriers to accessing payment.

How will the research be carried out?

Developmental evaluation is being used, which produces real-time or close to real-time feedback, allowing stakeholders to use the learning within the lifespan of the initiative to adapt principles of practice (Quinn Patton 2015). We will collect information to inform the approach to co-production, the ability of co-production to identify issues with the existing service, and the creation of a Direct Payment Support Service (DPSS) model that contains solutions to enabling people to feel more in control of direct payment.

Timeframe:

Due to be completed in April 2017.

Who is undertaking the research?

Disability Sheffield Centre for Independent Living

Project Lead: Emily Morton

http://www.disabilitysheffield.org.uk/

School of Health & Related Research

Lead Evaluator: Janet Harris

http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr

How are stakeholders being engaged?

Disability Sheffield Centre for Independent Living is a membership and user led organisation, run and controlled by disabled people. Service users, workers, managers and commissioners will be engaged in identifying barriers to using the payment scheme and generating solutions together. Participatory approaches are being used to involve everyone in reflecting on the process of co-production, including

  • Ability to create a level playing field, where the voice of different types of stakeholders is represented
  • Ability to facilitate dialogue and reflection across diverse people and groups
  • Transparency in collecting information and showing people how it is going to be used
  • Involvement of stakeholders in decisions about how to use information to inform service development
  • Ability to negotiate conflict and resolve issues

What will be the outputs from the study?

A model for the service which enables people to be more in control of managing their payments.

A good practice guide on using co-production to inform user-centred commissioning.


Enhancing community genetic literacy

Funded by Genetic Disorders UK and CLAHRC Yorkshire & Humber

 What are the aims of this project?

This project aims to develop materials and approaches for enhancing genetic literacy at community level with a focus on the genetic risk associated with customary consanguineous marriage.

 Why is this important?

Populations that practice customary consanguineous marriage have higher rates of infant mortality and lifelong disability due to a heightened risk of autosomal recessive genetic conditions. WHO recommends: training health professionals, raising genetic literacy at population level, and focused services for families at risk. However, UK service responses are in their infancy and most people at risk have little or no understanding on which to make informed decisions. The need to increase understanding and develop appropriate services has been identified in Sheffield at both community and professional levels.

This project links to our wider programme of work on developing an appropriate service response to genetic risk associated with customary consanguineous marriage.

 How will the research be carried out?

A participatory, action research project has been adopted with the goal of developing, delivering and evaluating a community-based genetic literacy and support model. Working closely with community researchers, we undertook an iterative process of generating insight, developing materials and testing our approach.  Follow on work is now underway to evaluate more rigorously an informational video that has been developed.

Timeframe:

March 2013 – March 2016

Who is undertaking the research?

Professor Sarah Salway, Dr Parveen Ali, Saima Ahmed (Pakistan Advice & Community Association), Dr Liz Such

 How are stakeholders being engaged?

The project involves close collaboration between university researchers, public health practitioners and community based organisations. The participatory approach involved community researchers who were trained and supported to gather and analyse data in their communities. An advisory group was convened to provide critical commentary on the initial research, involving lay and professional members. The project now reports regularly to the Sheffield Community Genetics Working Group. Findings and progress are shared regularly across the region with stakeholders.

What will be the outputs from the study?

A video has been developed and is available on request s.salway@sheffield.ac.uk

A presentation on the project was delivered by Sarah Salway at the Lancet/UCL Public Health Science conference in Glasgow in November, 2014.Towards enhanced community genetic literacy among a minority ethnic community: a participatory action research project


WiLD: Weight Loss for people with Learning Disabilities

What are the aims of this project?

The aims were to identify where modifications can be made to Slimming World, a private, UK wide, weight management intervention, to make changes to the intervention and to evaluate and further refine the modified intervention in a small feasibility study in order to provide a more equitable service for overweight and obese people with learning disabilities.

 

Why is this important?

Adults with learning disabilities have a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than people in the general population. Obesity is known to reduce life expectancy and increase morbidity. Commercial weight management organisations have been shown to be clinically and cost effective for weight management in the general population. However a small body of evidence suggests they are not accessible or acceptable to everyone and it is not known to what extent they are accessible and relevant to people with learning disabilities.

 

How will the research be carried out?

This qualitative study had two stages: An initial stage used interviews and focus groups to identify where potential modifications could improve acceptability and accessibility of the intervention. The second stage evaluated the modified intervention in a small feasibility study.

 

Timeframe:

March 2014 – February 2016

 

Who is undertaking the research?

Liz Croot, Melanie Rimmer, Alicia O’ Cathain, Sarah Salway, Janet Harris. Chris Hatton (University of Lancaster), Emma Dowse (Slimming World), Jacquie Lavin (Slimming World)

 

How are stakeholders being engaged?

A steering group of people with LD contributed to the design and conduct of the study. We worked with people with LD and Slimming World group leaders to identify where modifications were needed and to evaluate the modifications that we made.

 

What will be the outputs from the study?

We hope that Slimming world will be able to use our recommendations to develop their services for people with learning disabilities.