Good practice in the co-production of commissioned services within adult social care

Good Practice by Ron Mader https://www.flickr.com/photos/planeta/24569983877

Project title

Good practice in the co-production of commissioned services within adult social care

Funder

Skills for Care Workforce Development Innovation Fund

What are the aims of this project?

The aim is to evaluate whether the involvement of stakeholders in review and co-design of a modified Direct Payment Support Service for Disability informs changes in the design of the service and removes barriers to accessing payment.

How will the research be carried out?

Developmental evaluation is being used, which produces real-time or close to real-time feedback, allowing stakeholders to use the learning within the lifespan of the initiative to adapt principles of practice (Quinn Patton 2015). We will collect information to inform the approach to co-production, the ability of co-production to identify issues with the existing service, and the creation of a Direct Payment Support Service (DPSS) model that contains solutions to enabling people to feel more in control of direct payment.

Timeframe:

Due to be completed in April 2017.

Who is undertaking the research?

Disability Sheffield Centre for Independent Living

Project Lead: Emily Morton

http://www.disabilitysheffield.org.uk/

School of Health & Related Research

Lead Evaluator: Janet Harris

http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr

How are stakeholders being engaged?

Disability Sheffield Centre for Independent Living is a membership and user led organisation, run and controlled by disabled people. Service users, workers, managers and commissioners will be engaged in identifying barriers to using the payment scheme and generating solutions together. Participatory approaches are being used to involve everyone in reflecting on the process of co-production, including

  • Ability to create a level playing field, where the voice of different types of stakeholders is represented
  • Ability to facilitate dialogue and reflection across diverse people and groups
  • Transparency in collecting information and showing people how it is going to be used
  • Involvement of stakeholders in decisions about how to use information to inform service development
  • Ability to negotiate conflict and resolve issues

What will be the outputs from the study?

A model for the service which enables people to be more in control of managing their payments.

A good practice guide on using co-production to inform user-centred commissioning.


Inequitable access to services for older people

Funded by the NIHR School for Public Health Research as part of the Ageing Well Programme of research.

What are the aims of this project?

The project investigates the extent to which older people receive inequitable access to effective and cost-effective health interventions, both clinical and public health. A range of conditions and health interventions which are effective in both younger and older people will be examined.

We will focus on the potential impact of interventions in older populations on inequalities in health outcomes. We will explore how such inequalities arise and seek to identify ways to intervene to prevent them.

Social inequalities in health among older populations seem to be widening and this work package will explore one potentially important cause with a view to identifying ways to reduce such inequalities.

Why is this important?

It is important because the health of older people will be adversely affected if they fail to receive health interventions which improve the quality and quantity of life. Moreover, age-discrimination is something which has been found fairly extensively in the past, but should not be occurring now, not least because recent age-equality legislation has been introduced.

How will the research be carried out?

A number of sub-studies are being undertaken. Currently, the research carried out in ScHARR includes two sub-studies:

  • A literature review of existing published evidence about inequality in access to health interventions in older people:
  • A study using existing data on utilisation of smoking cessation services in older people.

Timeframe:

From November 2013 until March 2017

Who is undertaking the research?

In Sheffield

Sarah Salway, Nick Payne, Melanie Rimmer, Hannah Jordan

How are stakeholders being engaged?

  1. Stakeholder consultation events; and
  2. Engagement with PPI representatives on the ScHARR SPHR Advisory Group.

What will be the outputs from the study?

  • Presentations at scientific conferences:
    Early findings were presented at the British Society for Gerontology Annual Conference in Newcastle, UK in July 2015.
  • Publications in Journals

Reports and presentations to lay audiences including stakeholders


WiLD: Weight Loss for people with Learning Disabilities

What are the aims of this project?

The aims were to identify where modifications can be made to Slimming World, a private, UK wide, weight management intervention, to make changes to the intervention and to evaluate and further refine the modified intervention in a small feasibility study in order to provide a more equitable service for overweight and obese people with learning disabilities.

 

Why is this important?

Adults with learning disabilities have a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than people in the general population. Obesity is known to reduce life expectancy and increase morbidity. Commercial weight management organisations have been shown to be clinically and cost effective for weight management in the general population. However a small body of evidence suggests they are not accessible or acceptable to everyone and it is not known to what extent they are accessible and relevant to people with learning disabilities.

 

How will the research be carried out?

This qualitative study had two stages: An initial stage used interviews and focus groups to identify where potential modifications could improve acceptability and accessibility of the intervention. The second stage evaluated the modified intervention in a small feasibility study.

 

Timeframe:

March 2014 – February 2016

 

Who is undertaking the research?

Liz Croot, Melanie Rimmer, Alicia O’ Cathain, Sarah Salway, Janet Harris. Chris Hatton (University of Lancaster), Emma Dowse (Slimming World), Jacquie Lavin (Slimming World)

 

How are stakeholders being engaged?

A steering group of people with LD contributed to the design and conduct of the study. We worked with people with LD and Slimming World group leaders to identify where modifications were needed and to evaluate the modifications that we made.

 

What will be the outputs from the study?

We hope that Slimming world will be able to use our recommendations to develop their services for people with learning disabilities.